My Weekly Score: Crazy Daisy Dishes

Corelle’s Corning Ware is usually nothing worth shaking a stick at. (That’s a strange expression, isn’t it?) However, we recently had a very nice sale of a group of dishes in the “Crazy Daisy” pattern.

The pattern also goes by “Spring Blossom” and just features a basic white background and green flowers along the edges.

If you ever see this pattern in a thrift store, pick it up! We had 81 pieces in our lot and listed it as a single group. Corelle is pretty sturdy, and there was no major damage to any of the pieces.

This group sold fairly quickly at $120.00. We paid less than $10 for it all! The buyer also paid for shipping, so that was a huge plus as well.

While there’s no guarantee that this pattern will always sell well (that depends on A LOT of factors), we think it’s definitely worthy of picking it up to try listing it.

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My Weekly Score: Irving Books

Things have been a little crazy around here lately, so I’m sorry for the gaps in our regular posting. I’m trying to stay on top of it, but I have to make sure I put the eBay store first. That’s the money maker after all. 😉

Also, to all my blogging friends: I’m not ignoring you! I haven’t been able to get into my blog e-mail for a few weeks. For some reason it just won’t let me log in. As soon as it’s up, though, rest assured I’ll make the rounds. I might just be a tad behind for a while, though.

But anyway, I promised two My Weekly Score posts this week, and here’s the first one. This is all about a set of books we sold by Washington Irving.

There are eight of them total, and they all seem to be from the late 1800s to the early 1900s. The titles included The Alhambra, Conquest of Granada, Conquest of Spain, Spanish Voyages; Tales of a Traveller, Bracebridge Hall, Abbotsford, Wolfert’s Roost; The Life and Voyages of Columbus; Life of Washington I-II; Life of Washington III-IV; Astoria, Capt. Bonneville, Salmagundi; Mahomet, Goldsmith, Moorish Chronicles; Sketch Book, Crayon Papers, Knickerbocker, Tour of the Prairies

The books did have some damage, which you can see in the pictures, but nothing that made them unreadable. We picked these up for just a few dollars and sold them for…

…$70! Not bad. 😀

Have you had any luck buying, selling, or collecting vintage books?

Word of the Week: Ball and Claw

“Ball and claw” refers to the shape of the footed legs of an item – whether it be as small as a sugar bowl or as big as a tub. In particular, this gives us a claw that is gripping a round ball (usually glass). It’s a pretty classic design and kind of Medieval-chic, if such a thing exists.

It’s as simple as that! This particular ball and slaw foot belongs to one leg of a piano stool we recently sold. Check out the wide shot:

Have you come across this before? What item was it?

My Weekly Score: Wallace Silverplate Compote

Wallace is a really great name in silverplate, so if the price is right, I’d suggest always picking up a piece if you see one!

The above is a silverplate compote from Wallace. Traditionally used to serve compote the dessert, it can also be used as a centerpiece of just another bowl to put fruit or even salad in.

This is indeed silverplate, with no dents or dings. It definitely needed a good polish, but I always leave that up to the buyer, as some people like the tarnished look.

But it had a sticker! And stickers always good.

We bought this in a lot with other pieces of silver. We probably only ended up paying a couple of dollars for each piece – max – and sold it for $41.99. Whooo!

Do you like Wallace silver, or do you prefer another brand name?

Word of the Week: Andirons

An andiron is an L-shaped iron bar used in the fireplace to hold wood. They come in pairs and logs are laid across the horizontal portion, in order to build up a fire. Getting the wood up off the ground allows more air to pass under the logs, reducing the amount of smoke. The vertical portion is there to catch the logs in case they settle and decide to roll.

These are usually made of cast or wrought iron (though the ones below are mostly brass). They’re footed, and some of the better (and older ones) have legs that are actually in the shape of legs! They may have clawed feet on the end, too. Some of these can be extremely ornate.

P.S. Happy Halloween to everyone out there planning some spooky or silly fun tonight! Eat lots of candy!!

My Weekly Score: Tiffany Style Butterfly Lamps

Tiffany lamps sell for a lot of money. But so do lamps that are just done in their likeness. Enter the beautiful stained glass butterfly themed lamp below:

This was in perfect condition – no chips, no cracks, no damage to speak of. It was a nice electrical table lamp that still worked. It’d be perfect for just about any room in the house – living room, bedroom, office.

We picked up this lamp for $61.60 and turned it around for $160. Not bad!

With lamps like this, it’s so important to make sure you take the extra time and effort to pack it up really well. They’re so fragile and the post office is so rough on boxes that you need to be extra careful.

Have you come across any good lamps lately?

Word of the Week: Gilding

Gilding is the process of applying gold (either in leaf or powder form) to another surface (like wood or ceramics). The object can either be completely covered, or just used to highlight certain accents.

I’ve seen some “gilded” items that were simply covered in gold paint. While I don’t necessarily find this wrong in anyway, the term IS supposed to be applied to objects covered in real gold.

For example:

This technique is also quite popular on picture frames. What’s the coolest thing you’ve seen gilded?